Sobre esta obra
One of our punishments in primary school was to copy the same line a hundred to a thousand times, depending on the severity of the act of disobedience: "I will not create unnecessary chatter in class so as to not disturb my classmates' learning." I remember this punishment vividly because I always wondered whether the teacher really thought that if we wrote the line enough times, we would actually internalize its message.

As I have come to learn, we all give each other this sort of punishment all the time. We don't necessarily write the lines but we tell them to ourselves and each other, until hopefully, someday, they ring true: "I am okay", "everything's fine", "all good".

These lines are about keeping it together and feeling as we are told - a skill we are forced to learn as children, which is reinforced in school, and rewarded in the workplace. God forbid we descend into emotional chaos and admit that it's not fine, that we are not okay, that things are only rarely good. What's to come of us then? Would it help to admit it? Would anyone help?

In this composition, I explore how keeping it together came to be something I once respected and strived for. I stand in the background wearing my Catholic school uniform (different shades of blue since our school was named after the Virgin Mary). I am barefoot on the black and white living room tiles of my family's home. I am holding something back but it leaks out of me and onto the floor. I try to make it pretty, but it can't - it's weird and ugly. I am telling everyone around me that everything is ok and I think I am doing a good job. I think they all believe me.
Detalles de entrega
Ships in a cardboard box from Accra

Keep It Together

Linda Dounia Rebeiz
Ghana, Senegal
Acrylic and ink on canvas
Año 2020
40 x 56.2 x 2 cm
€960 incl. IVA
Sobre esta obra
One of our punishments in primary school was to copy the same line a hundred to a thousand times, depending on the severity of the act of disobedience: "I will not create unnecessary chatter in class so as to not disturb my classmates' learning." I remember this punishment vividly because I always wondered whether the teacher really thought that if we wrote the line enough times, we would actually internalize its message.

As I have come to learn, we all give each other this sort of punishment all the time. We don't necessarily write the lines but we tell them to ourselves and each other, until hopefully, someday, they ring true: "I am okay", "everything's fine", "all good".

These lines are about keeping it together and feeling as we are told - a skill we are forced to learn as children, which is reinforced in school, and rewarded in the workplace. God forbid we descend into emotional chaos and admit that it's not fine, that we are not okay, that things are only rarely good. What's to come of us then? Would it help to admit it? Would anyone help?

In this composition, I explore how keeping it together came to be something I once respected and strived for. I stand in the background wearing my Catholic school uniform (different shades of blue since our school was named after the Virgin Mary). I am barefoot on the black and white living room tiles of my family's home. I am holding something back but it leaks out of me and onto the floor. I try to make it pretty, but it can't - it's weird and ugly. I am telling everyone around me that everything is ok and I think I am doing a good job. I think they all believe me.
Detalles de entrega
Ships in a cardboard box from Accra

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